Articles Posted in Humor

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Summary: I had a Colonoscopy back in 2012, and I thought that I would tell you about my experience.

I started going to my Primary Care Physician a short time after I returned from Colorado in 2004.  Among other things, she advised that I should get a colonoscopy by the time I turned 60.  About once a year, she would bring it up and I would dutifully nod.  Finally, last July, she asked about it again and I said, “You told me I just needed to do it by the time I turned 60.”  She then replied something like, “YOU’RE GOING TO WAIT UNTIL YOU’RE 60?”  Lovely woman but a bit of a temper.  Anyway, I assured her that I would get it done.  However, I kept putting it off, dragging my feet, taking my time, until I realized that the big SIX ZERO was looming.  By the time I called to make an appointment, I could not get one until eleven days past my birthday.  Close enough.

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Written by: Patricia I. James**

For those of you who do not know who J. K. Rowling is, which might consist of approximately three people in the entire world, she is the author of the hugely popular Harry Potter series and also the author of “The Casual Vacancy.”

When I read the latter (having read all of her books, sometimes twice), I really felt like I could hear her voice, that I could see that she had written this. Having KNOWN that she wrote it, that quite possibly impacted my belief.

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Written by: Patricia I. James**

This post addresses a scene in the second episode of “Monday Mornings” (See Post #25). Again, it involved peer review known as “Morbidity and Mortality” and dealt with consenting a patient.

Neurosurgeon Tina Ridgeway, M.D. was invited to the podium to discuss the file of patient Francine Cash. Ms. Cash had a tumor on the brain and underwent an operation. Dr. Ridgeway said that the “procedure seemingly went well with no incident.” The Chief Surgeon, Dr. Hooten, pounced on the word “seemingly.” He asked Dr. Ridgeway about the risks of surgery. She said that the risks were bleeding, infection, stroke and possible damage to olfactory nerve (pertaining to the sense of smell) which ran proximate to the growth. If the nerve was nicked or cut, Ms. Cash could lose her sense of smell.

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Written by: Patricia I. James**

I will start by saying that it would be difficult for me to care less about sports. I did , once upon a time, root for the Denver Broncos but it was basically because I had a crush on John Elway. I also, from time to time, took some interest in the winter Olympics but that is probably because I have a thing for snow. I can’t remember the last football, baseball or basketball game I watched. Same for tennis, golf and bowling, although there is some grumbling out there that the latter two aren’t even a sport.

However, I did pay attention to the career of Lance Armstrong after reading his book, “It’s Not About the Bike.” Supposedly the reasons he was able to excel at his sport were (1) his oversized heart beats extremely fast and thus pumps an extraordinarily large volume of blood and oxygen to his legs; (2) his VO2 max, which measures the maximum amount of oxygen your lungs can take in, is much higher than the average person; and (3) the low lactic production, since Lance’s muscles produce about half as much acid as the average person’s muscles do when they get fatigued, it allows him to recover much faster than other people. Made sense to me. Yep, I swallowed it hook, line and sinker. I know. How naive could I be?

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Written by Patricia I. James**

Yesterday, I attended a Case Management Conference (“CMC”) (See Post # 3) in Riverside. I drove there. I know I should have made a telephonic appearance as did the two opposing counsel. However, it is so invigorating to get up at 5:00 a.m., hit stop and go traffic on the I-215, breathe in the exhaust fumes and just barely make it to court at 8:30 a.m. Nothing like that adrenaline rush.

Two things occurred at the hearing which were interesting, at least, to me. First, there was actually a court reporter at the hearing in Riverside. Although I have only attended two or three hearings in San Diego County since the cessation of court reporters, each time it has seemed strange to not see them. Now it seemed odd to see one. I guess the ax has not come down yet in Riverside County.

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Written by: Patricia I. James**

Okay, instead of relying on Dave, Shelly and Chainsaw for information regarding the healthcare debate, I decided to turn to the Los Angeles Times to broaden my education which, happily, ran two articles on the subject. They both ran under the banner, “Both sides face challenge.”

Obamacare:

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Written by:  Patricia I. James**

It is no secret that the State of California, as well as the rest of the United States, and probably the rest of the world, are undergoing a financial crisis.  Post #16 addressed the problems of receiving healthcare.  This post addresses the problems of your access to justice.

According to a news release from the San Diego Superior Court dated June 20, 2012, it faced cuts of as much as $14 million for the 2012-2013 fiscal year and could rise to $40 million for the 2013-2014 fiscal year.   However, a news release dated September 20, 2012 indicates that the cut is actually $33 million for 2012-2013.

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Written by: Patricia I. James**

Post #15 concerned a doctor who was engaging in balance billing, basically trying to get paid the entire amount of her bill rather than just accepting what the insurance company paid. One of the comments I received was a vote for socialized medicine. I responded to her comment and suggested she read an article in Forbes that dealt with that issue. I subsequently read back issues of the Los Angeles Times (Saturday is my day to read the week’s editions), and came across an article by Chad Terhune which addressed the fact that Anthem/Blue Cross was going to cut Cedars-Sinai (Cedars”) and UCLA from its health plan.

Now, these two issues are not at opposite ends of the spectrum. If I drew a circle (imagine a clock), I would arbitrarily put socialized medicine at 2:00 and insurance coverage at, say, 7:00. (My circle, my rules). However, they both address what type of care a patient may be able to receive.

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Written by : Patricia I. James **

Summary: You have medical insurance. You go to the emergency room because you need immediate medical care. It is your understanding that the doctor will accept whatever your insurance pays. Well, in somewhere between ten and fifty cases, Dr. Jeannette Martello did not and instead went after the patients for the full amount.

The source of today’s Post is an article entitled “State Suing Doctor Over Billing Tactics” published by Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times. It states that Jeannette Martello is a plastic surgeon who worked under contract to provide on-call emergency services at Huntington Memorial Hospital’s (“HMH”) emergency room.